Oct 10

Top Five List: Design Magazines

Top Five List: Design Magazines

by Jessica Bradford

With so many design magazines out there, how do you choose which ones to pick-up and which ones to pitch? Knowing what magazines your designer looks to for inspiration may help influence your decision. Here are my top five must read design magazines:

elle

 

Elle Décor: “Elle Décor is where style lives”

Focusing on the culture of design, Elle Décor appeals to the home owner, as well as their designer. A flip through the pages will introduce you to new products for the home, a list of “must stop” shops, as well as a plan for your next vacation. With its wide range of coverage, Elle Décor is a must have for your design library.

id

 

 

 

Interior Design: “Interior Design is the magazine for the interior design professional marketplace”

With special semi-monthly editions focusing on design trends and market introductions, Interior Design Magazine is geared towards design professionals, but it also has many ideas for the home owner. Featured projects showcase homes from around the world in a wide array of design styles.

 

ad

 

Architectural Digest: “Architectural Digest is the international authority on design and architecture”

The name Architectural Digest can be misleading – many think this magazine isn’t for the average home owner, but it is! Architectural Digest focuses on a complete home – architecture and design – and how the two interact. Many issues feature international projects which, in an increasingly eclectic world, can help a home owner define their personal style.

 

luxe

 

 

 

Luxe: “Luxe Interiors and Design Magazine is the uncompromised source for those with a passion for creating beautiful surroundings and living well”

With headquarters in Boca Raton, Luxe is a Florida favorite. By blending the flavor of local design with national trends, Luxe appeals to both design professionals and home owners. Geared towards the “sophisticated” home owner, Luxe features luxury homes that showcase unique aspects of design.

 

veranda

 

 

Veranda: “Veranda is both an ideas showcase and a deeply pleasurable escape, a place where homes feel as good as they look”

Veranda is a true “lifestyle” magazine – it focuses not only on the design, but also how spaces are lived in and used. Glamour and high fashion are at the forefront of Veranda’s design focus. Opulent homes with luxurious features are often high-lighted. Rarely diving into architecture or speaking in designer tongue, Veranda is an excellent magazine for the home owner.

 

 

 

It is worth noting that there are plenty of other design magazines, including regional publications, which may suit your needs. As this industry is constantly changing, our favorite inspiration sources change with the trends – a favorite pick today may not be a favorite pick tomorrow.

 

 

Sep 26

Five Design Trends That Should NEVER Make a Come Back

Five Design Trends That Should NEVER Make a Come Back

By Nicole Casiano

 

Why should you pay attention to design trends? Because they are a great way to measure how styles have evolved over the years – much in the way fashions become vogue or passe. However, when we look back on those old photos Mom insists on bringing out whenever we bring a new friend home and we cringe at the site of some of the “style” choices we made, we can at least learn from our mistakes. The practical lesson here is to examine which design trends have fallen out of style so you can avoid being the person who still wears crocethed leg warmers. Not to say that there will never be a time or two that wearing said leg warmers wouldn’t be appropriate; but (hopefully) the trend will never return. Let’s take a look back at some Interior Design trends that should NEVER make a come back:

Faux wood paneling instantly dates a room

Faux wood paneling instantly dates a room

1. Faux Wood Paneling: More precisely, when it is applied floor to ceiling. This trend first became popular in the 1950′s and transcended its way through the 80′s. Don’t misinterpret – real wood paneling can be beautiful and certainly has it’s place, which was once associated with rich elegance, and can give warmth to a space. But just like any cheap knock-off, faux paneling doesn’t make the cut and moved from basements and living rooms to everything from mini-vans and station wagons to boats. This element has a dated and heavy look that does not match many of the lighter contemporary styles of today and in many cases this application can be overwhelming and even dwarf smaller rooms.

 

We won't even mention the colors in this carpeted bathroom

We won’t even mention the colors in this carpeted bathroom

 

2. Carpeted Bathrooms: I can’t fathom how this was ever a popular practice. The hygiene factor alone is enough to make my skin crawl. The mere thought of what was thriving under those carpets after repetitive moisture and more (ewww!) have saturated it, is beyond disgusting and more than enough reason as to why this trend is one that should never-ever be allowed again.

 

 

An advertisement for matching, colored plumbing fitxures

An advertisement for matching, colored plumbing fitxures

 

3. Colored Plumbing Fixtures: This trend is beyond passe. Nothing screams Grandma’s house more than the tacky yellow, green or pink plumbing fixtures that became ever so popular in the 60′s and 70′s. This in my opinion is yet another bathroom nightmare that should never be repeated. They are gaudy and prove difficult to coordinate when your bathroom is due for renovations.

 

 

 

Sketches of furniture suites from the Industrial Revolution

Promotional material of furniture suites from the Industrial Revolution

4. Matching Suites: The Industrial Revolution had a dramatic impact on Interior Design and Architecture, by increasing the prosperity of the middle class and allowing them the opportunity to change the decoration and ornamentation of their homes. Many who were unsure of how to best go about decorating chose to fill their homes with these suites that were being massed produced. Everything matched and looked similar to one another; think Sunday paper furniture ad. This is not design, design coordinates pieces, bringing elements together in a harmonious and fashionable way, not just selecting one style and repeating it on all of the furniture in your home.

 

5. Dysfunctional Decorating: This term was coined by legendary designer Mario Buatta and goes by many names: “it’s not done, ’til it’s over done,” ‘country clutter,” etc. While the Industrial Revolution brought about the abundance of “matchy matchy” designs, it also favored overstuffed design, where people tried to cram as many pieces of furniture, fabrics and nicknacks as possible into their homes. In an attempt to both showcase their newly found cultural interests, prosperity and status and to also demonstrate the belief that bareness in a room was poor taste. A home should not be over styled – negative space is important to give your design some relief. A home is where we live our lives and should be reflective of the people who inhabit the space and should function accordingly. While this trend may not be entirely gone just yet, it should never return once it has seen its finally days.

A well designed space, like this one by Lana Knapp, ASID, makes all the difference

A well designed space, like this one by Lana Knapp, ASID, makes all the difference

Sep 12

How Technology has Influenced Interior Design

How Technology has Influenced Interior Design

By Sarah Gerrero

As technology continues to advance at a rapid pace, it is not surprising that we all have become a bit more tech savvy in both our personal and professional lives. However, would you have thought that your house, your clothes, or your favorite artist could incorporate these emerging technologies? You may be surprised at the practical applications of technology and how it can influence the design of your project.

 

In 2014, we are all constantly connected

In 2014, we are all constantly connected

Instant Contact

Millenials (those born roughly between 1980-2000) and Gen-Exers, as well as older generations, have become accustomed to living in a world full of tweets, texting and emails; all of which are an instant exchange of information. Living and working in a world where information travels at lighting speeds has a profound impact on the design process – we are now able to design a project half-way across the world, with minimal lag. This helps alleviate a lot of stress related to the design process, especially in our area, where most projects are a seasonal residence.

 

 

A digital rendering created in Lumion

A digital rendering created in Lumion

Design Tools

The tedious, time consuming process of manual sketching has become replaced by the ease of digital drawings. Designers are now able to relay their ideas faster and with greater precision, even early on in the design process. Digital design allows both designers and customers to see the results of their ideas sooner, see the spaces differently, and work in three dimensions. Lumion, a real-time 3-D visualization tool for architects, urban planners and designers, is one such product that allows the client to see the finished product before the ground is even broken.

Advanced Art

Advances in art range from digital graphic design to social media to 3-D printing. Both art historians and artists alike are aware of the changes in technology and while some fear it, there are those who embrace it to create a brand new era in the art world. Among art aficionados there is a concern that digitally created art may be viewed as an inauthentic medium that lacks the passion and depth of a piece made “by hand” in the traditional sense. On the contrary, mediums such as cinematography (moving images), are being embraced as a way to capture a moment – if a picture is worth a thousand words, how many words is a moving picture worth? Whether you see these advances as positive or negative, you cannot deny the fact that technology has made art more accessible to a vast audience.

A 3-D printed architectural model

A 3-D printed architectural model

 

LED light bulbs bring new technology to existing fixtures

LED light bulbs bring new technology to existing fixtures

LED Lighting

Lighting has become more advanced than just simply being turned on and turned off and LED (light emitting diode) lighting is a prime example. On the practical side, LED’s are available in multiple colors, generate less heat and use a fraction of the energy of older bulbs. Many LED bulbs emit a cooler color temperature (more blue light), which stimulates the photo-receptors in your eyes that reduces melatonin, helping you stay awake. A leader in the industry, Light Science, is also releasing a light called ‘Rhythm Downlight’ which can be controlled by a smart phone app that adjusts the light depending on the persons sleep cycle (side-note: your smart phone emits a blue light and should be avoided when trying to sleep). On the aesthetic side, there are other advantages, one being the ability to control the color temperature in a space, specifically when lighting art – we can now dim from bright to dark, as well as from warm to cool.

 

Fabrics of the Future

In a world where everything is moving forward and becoming tech savvy, who would have thought that fabric could join in? Judit Eszter Karpati thought it was possible, and for her master’s project she teamed up with a London based company, Cute Circuit, and created a line called Chromosonic. This fabric line reacts to touch, as well as sound. But how? These fabrics have been dyed with thermo-chromatic ink, which changes color when its temperature increases or decreases. For the fabric to react to audio the designer inter-weaved nichrome wires into the fabric; the energy from the sound causes the wires to heat, which in turn, changes the temperature of the ink and changes the color. Oh, and that invisible cloak isn’t too far away either!

A fabric fromt he Chromosonic line from Judit Eszter Karpati

A fabric from the Chromosonic line from Judit Eszter Karpati

At Collins & DuPont we embrace these emerging technologies to help make the design process as seamless as possible and provide the client with the most beautiful, comfortable and convenient design they could have ever imagined.

 

Sep 02

Design Trends to Watch: A Q&A with the Collins & DuPont Design Team

Integrate the old with the new in your accessories

Integrate the old with the new in your accessories

Design Trends to Watch: A Q&A with the Collins & DuPont Design Team

With peak season around the corner and many winter residents seeking to update their look, we at Collins & DuPont have received a number of questions about what’s in, what’s out, and what’s trending now in the home design industry. To answer those questions for our clients and readers, Collins & DuPont’s Director of Marketing & Public Relations, Jessica Dodge, sat down with our lead designers to answer those questions and here’s what our award-winning teams had to say about design trends to watch this season.

Q: What style of interior design is trending right now?

A: While the trend towards contemporary is still strong, we are seeing strong nods to Classicism returning. This is presenting through mixed use of classic, straight line furniture with the addition of occasional antiques and family heirlooms of all periods and ethnicity. Modern day “contemporary” is translating to a more eclectic mix of young and old pieces that showcase both past and present.

Q: What about furniture? Are there any trends to watch or consider?

A: Repurposing old or existing pieces is becoming quite popular and is a great way to give any room a fresh eye, simply by moving a piece to another space. By investing in good furniture that will transcend fads, and pieces you absolutely love that have the quality to be passed from generation to generation, the integrity of the piece will uphold and add an essence of character to any room it’s showcased in throughout the years.

Tone down the red by swapping to corals and rusts

Tone down the red by swapping to corals and rusts

 

Q: What color trends are you all noticing for the season?

A: Out with the reds and golds and in with butter-cream and citrus tones! Use tangerine and coral instead of red and consider mixing those hues with aqua, amethyst, and soft a mixed palette of soft whites. We are seeing a very strong use of amethyst, lilac, and periwinkle as well as cool reds like raspberry and plumb combined with a mixture of crisp linens and warm gray tones as well.

 

 

Q: What about white? As we all know, there are a hundred shades of white. Can you all recommend a good go-to?

A: “Chantilly Lace” by Benjamin Moor is the white of preference for most homes. Although there are countless shades of white, this one is almost always the perfect background color for trim and cabinetry.

 

Try mixing metallic tones in unexpected mediums, like upholstery

Try mixing metallic tones in unexpected mediums, like upholstery

Q: What about accent pieces and hardware? What’s trending there?

A: Mix your metals! It is no longer necessary to have all silver or all gold. Again, we say be fearless in approach. Don’t be afraid to mix light bronze with gold and brass with silver, etc. Consider this the accent jewelry of your décor and go with it.

 

"Less is More" in this simple, white kitchen

“Less is More” in this simple, white kitchen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q: What about accessorizing my house? Any recommendations?

A: We are all seeing that it is time for many homeowners, including ourselves, to “de-clutter” those spaces around the home collecting dust. Remove all those silk plants off the plant ledges and the forest from your living room. Remove accessories and rotate the placement of key sentimental pieces. Also remove all those pillows with the matted fringes from the sofa and bed. “Less is More” is the mantra in style.

Q: How about lighting trends? Any changes there?

A: Try changing out the shades on heavy, overdone old world lamps with spruce up a space. We also recommend adding glass or crystal to a well lit room to reflect the sunlight and enhance the natural ambiance of the space. What about the natural Florida sunshine? Remove heavy draperies that block the beautiful view and all that light. Windows need nothing more than innocuous sun shades for sun control and side panels to frame your view and help with the acoustics in a room with high ceilings.

Let in the light!

Let in the light! These tall windows aren’t hindered by draperies – flooding this Master Suite with natural light.

All and all, the trends of the season are about brightening up your home with enhanced light, softer color hues and less clutter, while adding sophistication and maintaining the warmth through use of old and new pieces throughout.

Does your home need a refresh? For design assistance or to set-up a consultation, please contact Collins & DuPont Design Group at 239.948.2400.

 

Aug 15

A Quick Guide to Design Terminology: Furniture

This etagere from Global Views was inspired by tree branches

This etagere from Global Views was inspired by tree branches

A Quick Guide to Design Terminology: Furniture

By Christine Stewart

Interior design is a world unto itself and just like other professions, it has its very own language. The industry has its own abbreviations, adjectives, and furniture terminology which we use frequently, forgetting that not everyone speaks this language. The following are a few definitions and clarifications to help you interpret “designer speak” regarding your furnishings.

Is it a pouf or an ottoman? An ottoman is a low, upholstered seat or foot rest (think of a lower chair, without a back). In contrast to an ottoman, a pouf usually does not have legs and the frame is often completely covered.

 

On the left is a pouf, on the right is an ottoman - both from Cyan Designs

On the left is a pouf, on the right is an ottoman – both from Cyan Designs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sofa, settee, or couch? In historical terms, “sofa” and “settee” were often used in Europe, whereas the word “couch” is typically used in North America. However, in “designer speak” the correct term used is “sofa” – you had a couch in college, now you’re an adult and you have a sofa. We won’t even get into davenport, chesterfield, or divan – all synonyms for a sofa.

From Century Upholstery - a sectional, a sofa and a settee

From Century Upholstery – a sectional, a sofa and a settee

Console tables and cocktail tables and occasional tables, oh my.  A console table is designed to fit against a wall or the back of a sofa and is generally long and narrow. It may also be a demilune console, defined by is crescent shape.  A cocktail table is typically a low table designed to be set before a seating group (taller versions are described as “chat height”). The layman’s term for this would be a coffee table. An occasional table is a generic term used for any small table.

 

Occasional tables from Hickory Chair - a round, wooden cocktail table, a metal base console table and a wood demilune with storage

Occasional tables from Hickory Chair – a round, wooden cocktail table, a metal base console table and a wood demilune with storage

With terminology like bergere (an 18th century armchair) and etagere (a piece with many open shelves for display), there is no doubt you may be confused by some of the things your interior designer describes to you. Never be afraid to ask your designer what these terms mean and have no doubt that these strange words will make your rooms “pop” and “flow”.

Aug 01

Out of State Projects

During remote installations, we take time to enjoy the local scenery, like Falls Park South Dakota!

During remote installations, we take time to enjoy the local scenery, like Falls Park South Dakota!

Out of State Projects

By Andi Blankenship & Vanessa Covington Smith

 

What is more exciting for an interior designer than to see their design concept come to fruition?  Furniture and accessory placement and hanging of artwork are all facets of the finished product.  At Collins & DuPont, we can deliver your finished product to anywhere in the United States and abroad.

 

It all starts with packing things up from our local warehouse in Ft. Myers

It all starts with packing things up from our local warehouse in Ft. Myers

 

 

More and more of our clients are asking for our help on their other homes, located through-out the world. When we tell our friends and families about these exciting, out-of-state projects, we are sometimes asked, “Why would they fly you all that way? There must be designers in that area!” Design is not just about who make a room the prettiest; it is also about developing a trusting relationship with a client who couldn’t imagine doing this project without you!

 

International shipping containers arriving outside a project in the Cayman Islands

International shipping containers arriving outside a project in the Cayman Islands

 

So, now that we’ve signed on for this adventure, how do we organize getting furniture and accessories from Florida to South Dakota, Michigan, the Cayman Islands or Paris?! It takes coordination and team work. Here are some of the steps involved in making these out of state and out of country deliveries happen.

For out of state deliveries, our delivery coordinators have to research a warehousing facility to receive the merchandise and a freight carrier to transport the merchandise. A team of our designers fly to the destination to meet the truck at the client’s residence and that is when the fun begins.

Out of country deliveries are a bit more complicated since a freight forwarder and cargo containers are needed. There are also maritime laws and dreaded customs documentation to prepare such a packing lists, invoices, and harmonize tariff codes.  The coordination between Collins & DuPont, the freight forwarder, and the client are essential.

 

 

We couldn't do it without our amazing crews, like JW Cole!

We couldn’t do it without our amazing crews, like JW Cole!

 

Now that you know we know how to handle the ins-and-outs of remote design and delivery, why not let Collins & DuPont take care of your next out of state or out of country design project! Have tape measure, will travel!

 

When we work hard, we play hard!

When we work hard, we play hard!

But sometimes, we just can't get out from under the bed ...

But sometimes, we just can’t get out from under the bed!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jul 18

How We Find Inspiration

How We Find Inspiration

By Joshua Colt Fisher

On a recent family road trip I decided to pull off the highway and enjoy a scenic route. After a while of enjoying the open fields and large oak trees over hanging the road the skies opened up to a torrential downpour. I decided it would be best to pull off to the side of the road and wait out the rain. Unfortunately, the rain was distorting the view of a grassy shoulder that was actually camouflaging a deep muddy quagmire. As our gas peddle quickly became useless, we came to the realization that we are going to need help. In my quest for a scenic route I have landed us out of cellphone range and it’s apparent I will have to have to exit the vehicle to find help. As I considered my options I remembered not more than a mile back seeing the red glimmer of a reflector precariously hanging from what I could only hope was a mailbox. So the family crawls over the back seats in search for anything that would help keep me dry on my trek to find assistance. As I make my way back to what I hope is an occupied residence, I realize the only part of my body even remotely dry are my shoulders which are barely covered by my daughter’s tiny purple poncho, my daughters’ favorite color. Thoughts of my circumstances continue to distract and I barely realize that 45 minutes have passed when I reach that red glimmering reflector that was in fact hanging from a mailbox. Through the down pour I can barely see lights that not only outline a structure tucked into forest but shed light on the end of my adventure.

"Walking in the Rain" by Canadian Artist Rosie Sherman

“Walking in the Rain” by Canadian Artist Rosie Sherman

 

A tin roof is not only practical, but also musical

A tin roof is not only practical, but also musical

Inspiration is often an emotional reaction linked to personal experiences. As designers, we find that it’s integral to have conversations with our clients that reveal elements of their lives that we can use to inform our design decisions. As in the narrative above, there are two paths of inspiration to explore: you could either steer clear of falling water, grassy expanses, dimly lit spaces and the colors red and purple or you could choose to embrace them.

When working with a client who just told us about one of their memorable adventures, here are a few examples of how we may try to embrace and incorporate some of those elements into our design:

 

The winding path of a gravel road

The winding path of a gravel road

- The client from our narrative may want lots of large overhangs around their house but made of a thin metal so that it will provide for protection from the rain and while creating an enjoyable background symphony while sharing breakfast on the porch.

- A gravel driveway may be preferred by this client instead of a typical paved material. The crunch of tires traveling over gravel driveway will remind them that they are traveling on firm ground.

 

Purple is not only whimsical and fanciful, but is also the 2014 Pantone Color of the Year

Purple is not only whimsical and fanciful, but is also the 2014 Pantone Color of the Year

 

- This client may also want to include the color purple in some inventive way as it helps remind them of the strength of a supportive family and would signify the daughter’s presence, even though she is now off at college.

- The client may also want to include the color red somewhere on the front of the house to remind them of the red reflector that lead them home. The color red could be integrated into the front door to strengthen the meaning of arriving home.

 

 

Red doors are popular for many reasons - religious traditions, family heritage or just because it's a great color!

Red doors are popular for many reasons – religious traditions, family heritage or just because it’s a great color!

 

Remember the in-depth conversations with your designer serve not only as a means of connecting but will also help unlock the initial flood of inspiration that will carry you both through the design process.

Jul 05

How Design has Shaped Our Country

How Design has Shaped Our Country usa-flag-map

By Jeff Mills

Design has influenced and shaped the United States in many ways, bringing worldwide ingenuity into our melting pot. Over the last hundreds of years our country has opened its arms to accept people from all over the world and those people bring with them inherited tastes in design. These different backgrounds and lifestyles help broaden our thoughts in design possibility and help us to see how design works in other countries.

 

The famous Charleston County Courthouse in South Carolina

The famous Charleston County Courthouse in South Carolina

It also presents ideas to combine design cultures together. For example, a man named James Hoban designed the Charleston County Courthouse in South Carolina after the Leinster House which is found in Dublin, Ireland. Not surprising, James was originally from Ireland and immigrated to the US after the Revolutionary War.

The elevation of the White House submitted by James Hoban

The elevation of the White House submitted by James Hoban

Bringing cultures together and seeing the result also influences other countries to take part as well. With doing so, America’s design has already and will continue to excel to greater heights.

Pictured at top: the White House. At bottom: Leinster House

Pictured at top: the White House. At bottom: Leinster House

Wishing you all a wonderfully designed Fourth of July from the Collins & DuPont Design Group!

 

Jun 09

Your “Off Season” is our “On Season”

Come October, the roads fill up in Southwest Florida!

Come October, the roads fill up in Southwest Florida!

Your “Off Season” is our “On Season”

By Linda Quinn

Southwest Florida has long been a vacation retreat for our northern neighbors. Around the middle of October, the roads begin to fill up with out of state license plates. “Season” has officially started. While the rest of the country is preparing to settle down for their long winter’s nap so to speak, we are ramping up into high gear for the return of our seasonal clientele.

Celebrating Christmas, Florida style!

Celebrating Christmas, Florida style!

After a five or six month hiatus, we are suddenly deluged by requests to freshen, brighten and spruce up our snowbirds’ homes. Naturally, they all hope to witness the transformations while they are in town. Thanksgiving and Christmas are particularly highly desired times of the year for furniture installations. Who wouldn’t relish the idea of spending the holidays with family in your newly remodeled home in paradise?

Balancing the surge in business between October and April can be challenging but has become an expected way of life in Southwest Florida. With a little tenacity, a lot of hard work and a sense of humor, we’ve managed to get through it season after season for the past 25 years.

Summer or winter - it's always paradise in Southwest Florida!

Summer or winter – it’s always paradise in Southwest Florida!

See you in the Fall!

May 25

Vintage Inspired Decor

This combination of modern and vintage decor create drama

This combination of modern and vintage decor create drama

Vintage Inspired Decor

By Carol Garcia

There are many accessory and furniture companies that are making a trend out of tradition, repurposing and upcycling found objects into unique decor for the home, or using these looks for inspired re-creations. Mixing antique inspiration with modern design creates contrast and interest in a space.

In our model homes, we have free reign to experiment with new looks and trends. In a recent model home on Barefoot Beach, designers Kim Collins, ASID and Alina Olinger flanked a modern abstract painting with onion-style sconces made to mimic oil lanterns. Modern white accessories from Jonathan Adler top the vintage breakfront. White washed wall planking gives the space a beach-side feel.

 

This vignette showcases a collection of vintage botanical prints

This vignette showcases a collection of vintage botanical prints

 

 

 

 

Not sure you want to go too far into the vintage trend? Why not try a small collection of vintage inspired accessories in an otherwise modern room – small vignettes within rooms can transform the feel of an entire space. Mercury glass has made a huge comeback in many designs, including pioneering its own vintage style. It is beautiful paired with rich textures, both new and old – linen, sateen, and champagne wood tones – and plays well in a group, or on its own.

 

 

 

 

The Parchment Series from E. Lawrence, LTD.

The Parchment Series from E. Lawrence, LTD.

 

As designers, we are often asked where we source our decor, and we have a few go-to favorites for vintage inspired accessories. First, there is E. Lawrence, LTD., who are the largest importer of decorative, leather bound books in the United States. These books make beautiful additions to bookcases, shelves, nightstands, and desks. There is also Lazy Susan, a company based in New York who focus on combining current trends with classic design elements.

 

Chicken wire cages, vintage glass vases, and mercury glass hurricanes by Lazy Susan

Chicken wire cages, vintage glass vases, and mercury glass hurricanes by Lazy Susan

 

Another company creates photobox collections, art prints and accessories, often using vintage wood and quotes as part of the design, along with hand painted lettering, adding to the rustic look of the piece. Sugarboo Designs has a showroom in the Atlanta Gift Mart and as I walk through their showroom, tears came to my eyes as I recalled times gone by.

Vintage quotes we all know and love from Sugarboo Designs

Vintage quotes we all know and love from Sugarboo Designs

One of the art pieces has the song “You Are My Sunshine” printed on it: when I was five years old I remember sitting in the back seat of the car (we were “going to town,” I was a country girl – born on a farm in Nebraska, in a horrible blizzard, as my mother would often remind me) and my sister and I would sing that song as loud as we could and my mom and dad would start singing along. To this day, each time I hear that song, I smile, or cry … or both. I like how there seems to be a story to tell using pieces like all of these. It stirs fond memories of life as it should be enjoyed – surrounded by friends, family and all that you love!

 

 

 

May 09

The Top Trends from April Market

The Top Trends from April Market

Great textural pattern on a chair from Century

Great textural pattern on a chair from Century

By: Jessica Bradford

 

Twice a year High Point, North Carolina hoststhe largest home furnishings trade show in the world. For six days hotels, rental cars, flights, and restaurants are booked beyond capacity as designers and other industry professionals fight for a chance to see new introductions from over 2,000 exhibitors. The weather for this year’s High Point Furniture Market may have been grey and dreary, but the new design trends kept it hot!

 

 

This April Market focused on exposing the natural beauty of wood grains

This April Market focused on exposing the natural beauty of wood grains

 

 

- Wood, Exposed

From Macassar ebony to mahogany, show casing the beauty and variation in natural wood graining was hot this market. But, by far, the show stopper was burl. Showcased on case goods, mirrors, and accessories, we saw burl reinvented in rich, dark java and warm grey. Wood also took center stage on upholstered pieces, in the form of exposed frames and banding, which can help a piece be beautiful in 360 views.

 

Furniture faces are given relief through intricate carvings and dimensional inlays

Furniture faces are given relief through intricate carvings and dimensional inlays

- Carve Your Niche and Accent Your Inlays

In addition to heavy wood graining, we saw a resurgence of intricate marquetry and carvings, creating beautiful relief on otherwise simple pieces. Mother-of-pearl inlays are ever popular, defining table tops and accenting accessories. Carved details range from classic fluting to stipple patterns and were featured on creamy painted tones, contrasting with rich dark woods.

Gold, silver, bronze - all were first place winners this April!

Gold, silver, bronze – all were first place winners this April!

 

- Metallica

Bronze, pewter, gold, silver, champagne and any combinations there of were prevalent through-out furniture, accessory, lighting, and fabric introductions. Although metals have been popular for the past few years, we are now seeing metals combined with each other, adding a whole new dimension.

 

Spot tables are hot tables

Spot tables are hot tables

 

 

 

- Spot on Spot Tables

Who doesn’t love a great spot table – they are so small, but can have such a big impact. Spot tables are an excellent way to bring in a bold color, pattern, or shape in a subtle, yet important way. From the classy martini table to the rustic log table, everyone has a spot for a spot table.

 

- Creature Comforts

Horses and jellyfish and birds, oh my! Wildlife is back, and not just in animal print! Bronze sculptures, lamps and artwork are all featuring animals, putting nature at the forefront. Natural elements, like hair-on-hide and abalone shells take the motif a step further and create a dichotomy with their otherwise transitional backgrounds.

We've seen animal motifs at many markets, but this spring creatures were the main event

We’ve seen animal motifs at many markets, but this spring creatures were the main event

 

Apr 25

Concept to Completion IV: Finishing Touches

This custom designer staircase creates a stunning focal point from almost any angle

This custom designer staircase creates a stunning focal point from almost any angle

Concept to Completion IV:  Finishing Touches

By: Brooke Brimacombe

What sets Collins & DuPont apart from all other design firms is our attention to detail. Throughout the design process, we make sure that a design concept is taken from the beginning phases of construction all the way to completion. We are not only responsible for your design development, but also permanent installations such as tile specifications and details, exterior detailing, and cabinetry drawings – our architectural detailing is absolutely stunning and stands out among the rest.

 

These custom designer draperies feature tape and button detailing

These custom designer draperies feature tape and button detailing

 

 

To bring a project to completion, we make sure the finishing touches do the architectural detailing justice. Once the interior shell is ready for installation, the area rugs and furnishings are placed. This is the point in the project when the designer sees their vision coming to life. The space is not quite a home yet. It takes those final finishing touches to make the house feel like your home. Custom draperies and bedding are a great way to soften a space and emphasize the concept and design style. We take the time to get to know our clients and they enjoy being a part of the design development, and we love their input.

 

Custom pillows with various trims and details for the Lily Pulitzer themed room

Custom pillows with various trims and details for the Lily Pulitzer themed room

 

 

 

 

A project we have in Grand Cayman is a great example of how important the finishing touches are to a project. For example, this client had two clothes hampers custom designed for their Master Bath and Powder Bathroom. One hamper is meant to be a showcase piece much like a jewelry box, upholstered out of a gold metallic fabric with detailing in gold and crystal nail heads in a harlequin shape to resemble the wall covering in the space. These same clients had intricate trimming details on their bedding and draperies to personalize every last inch of their home. Custom tapes and trims set their furniture, bedding and draperies apart from the rest. We even designed custom lamp shades in the Library Retreat so that the Lily Pullitzer fabrics could contrast the stained wood of the custom built credenza.

 

This custom designed hamper features hand placed jewel accents

This custom designed hamper features hand placed jewel accents

 

 

 

To give a space warmth and personalization, we fill tables and shelves with lamps and accessories, which make all the difference in the world. We were presented the opportunity in Grand Cayman with custom built-in bookcases all across the library retreat and up and down three flights of stairs. The client was amazed at the detail work involved to make these shelves look lived in while still maintaining a balanced composition.

 

Accessories, knick-knacks, chotskies - not matter what you call them, these small details are the finishing touches

Accessories, knick-knacks, chotskies – not matter what you call them, these small details are the finishing touches

 

 

 

 

Collins & DuPont offers a turn-key service – upon request, our clients can come down for season with their home completely stocked. We can have sheets cleaned and pressed, beds made, silverware in drawers, appliances under cabinets, tables set, and even champagne chilled for the client’s homecoming. We take detailing to the next level to ensure the client will be happy with their design for years to come. What makes this process so rewarding for Collins & DuPont designers is to receive a phone call from a client raving about a new detail that they just unveiled months or even years after a project’s completion. To Collins & DuPont, it is “all in the details.”

 

 

Perfectly color matched details for the outdoor living area

Perfectly color matched details for the outdoor living area

 

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